Ford Says It Would Consider Returning To F1 If It Was Cheaper

Ford Says It Would Consider Returning To F1 If It Was Cheaper

Ford says that the hybrid power units are still road relevant and that it would be interested in returning to Formula 1 if only the sport wasn't so expensive

After successfully transferring engineering knowledge from its WRC campaigns with the M-Sport team into some special edition road vehicles, Ford has highlighted that it would be open to doing the same in F1, though the lack of a cost cap appears to be the most significant barrier.

Whilst a cost cap in F1 at times seems like an impossible task, the fact that this is the biggest issue for a Ford return could be taken as a positive. Ford Motorsport’s boss, Mark Rushbrook, suggested that the hybrid tech F1 uses is something that really appeals to the company as a major manufacturer. He told Autocar:

“Hybrid power will be relevant for a long time for Ford, so I’d never say never to Formula 1, especially if it introduces budgets. Cost reduction in F1 is all relative. If you cap in one area, [manufacturers] will spend in another”.

Here is an automotive giant highlighting the road relevance of the hybrid technology in F1. It’s a statement that shows promise for F1 and makes small ground in negating the threat posed by Formula E and its relevance to the wider automotive industry.

Through its association with Cosworth, Ford has won more grands prix than any engine manufacturer except Ferrari
Through its association with Cosworth, Ford has won more grands prix than any engine manufacturer except Ferrari

This comment also puts a bit more pressure on Martin Whitmarsh in his new role with the FIA, given that he has been assigned with chasing some sort of cost cap ultimatum. For a long time, the narrative has been one of F1 dropping down the pecking order in the road relevance table, whereas comments like this show that a cost-effective approach could be the key to welcoming some big names.

We’ve already got Aston Martin gearing up to make an F1 engine, and the formerly Ford-owned Cosworth company has said that it’d love to team up with Aston. With these comments from Ford and the ever-present rumours of Audi and Porsche getting involved, those simplified 2021 engine regulations could be the key to a bit more diversity in the sport.