On This Day In F1 - Williams Win Another Constructors' Championship

On This Day In F1 - Williams Win Another Constructors' Championship

A look back at what happened on 11 August in Formula 1 history

1991 Hungarian GP
A tense, if slightly dull race, Ayrton Senna led the whole thing from start to finish. Nigel Mansell got close on occasion, but this was back when the Hungaroring was even harder to pass on than it is now. He was second, with teammate Riccardo Patrese third.

Sixth place for Ivan Capelli gave Leyton House its only point of the season, whilst Bertrand Gachot set the fastest lap of the race - the first for the Jordan team.

1996 Hungarian GP
This race was all about strategy and whether it was better to do a two- or three-stop race. Jacques Villeneuve was on a three-stopper and managed to leapfrog pole-sitter Michael Schumacher early on. Damon Hill meanwhile was on a two-stop, but a bad start dropped him down the order and so his team swapped him to a three.

Villeneuve's third win of his rookie season amped up his title challenge. (c) Williams/LAT
Villeneuve's third win of his rookie season amped up his title challenge. (c) Williams/LAT

That helped him move up to second, where he rapidly set about catching his teammate. Again, though, with overtaking nearly impossible, Villeneuve just had to focus on not making a mistake, and he took the victory as the one-two also secured Williams the constructors’ championship. Most importantly Ricardo Rosset finished eighth, the best result of his career.

Birthdays
Lucas di Grassi (born 1984) had a stellar GP2 career - in 2008 he was third in the championship despite missing six races - but his F1 career barely took off. His sole season came for the brand new Virgin team in 2010 where unfortunately his most memorable moment was crashing on the formation lap in Suzuka.

Di Grassi was replaced by Jerome d’Ambrosio for the following season but went on to become an Audi LMP1 driver. More famously he’s now one of the top drivers in Formula E, winning the Season 3 title and finishing runner-up twice.

D’ya like jazz? Because Johnny Claes (born 1916) was a jazz musician who also happened to be one of the many gentleman drivers who dabbled in F1 in the 1950s. In 23 starts Claes never scored a point but did race a number of different chassis - Talbot, Gordini, HWM, Connaught, Maserati and Ferrari - mostly for his own Ecurie Belge team.